Research

Identification of Motion Features Affecting Perceived Rhythmic Sense of Virtual Characters through Comparison of Latin American and Japanese Dances

  • Daisuke Iwai, Toro Felipe, Noriko Nagata and Seiji Inokuchi, "Identification of Motion Features Affecting Perceived Rhythmic Sense of Virtual Characters through Comparison of Latin American and Japanese Dances", The Journal of The Institute of Image Information and Television Engineers, Vol.65, No.2, pp.203-210, 2011.

Identification of Motion Features Affecting Perceived Rhythmic Sense of Virtual Characters through Comparison of Latin American and Japanese DancesPhysical motion features that cause a difference in the perceived rhythmic sense of a dancer were identified. We compared the rhythmical movements of Latin American and Japanese people to find such features. A 2-D motion capture system was used to measure rhythmical movement, and two motion features were identified. The first was the phase shift of the rotational angles between the hips and chest, and the second was the phase shift between the hips’ rotational angle and horizontal position. A psychophysical study demonstrated whether these features affected the perceived rhythmic sense of a dancer. The results showed that both motion features significantly affected perceived sense, and one of them also affected how a viewer guessed the home country or area of a dancer. Consequently, the rhythmic sense of a virtual character can be controlled easily by adding and removing features to and from the character’s synthesized motion.

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Subjective Difficulty Estimation for Interactive Learning by Sensing Vibration Sound on Desk Panel

  • Nana Hamaguchi, Keiko Yamamoto, Daisuke Iwai, Kosuke Sato, "Subjective Difficulty Estimation for Interactive Learning by Sensing Vibration Sound on Desk Panel", Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer, Volume 6439, pp.138-147, 2010 (In Proc. of International Joint Conference on Ambient Intelligence (AmI)).

Subjective Difficulty Estimation for Interactive Learning by Sensing Vibration Sound on Desk PanelIn this paper, we propose a method which estimates the student’s subjective difficulty with a vibration sound on a desk obtained by a microphone on the back of the desk panel. First, it classifies the student's behavior into writing and non-writing by analyzing the obtained sound data. Next, the subjective difficulty is estimated based on an assumption that the duration of non-writing behavior becomes long if the student feels difficult because he (or she) would not have progress on answer sheet. As a result, the accuracy of the proposed so simple behavior classification reaches around 80%, and that of the subjective difficulty estimation is 60%.

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CrossOverlayDesktop: Dynamic Overlay of Desktop Graphics between Co-located Computers for Multi-User Interaction

  • Daisuke IWAI, Kosuke SATO: CrossOverlayDesktop: Dynamic Overlay of Desktop Graphics between Co-located Computers for Multi-User Interaction, IEICE TRANSACTIONS on Information and Systems, Vol.E92-D, No.12, pp.2445-2453, 2009.

CrossOverlayDesktop: Dynamic Overlay of Desktop Graphics between Co-located Computers for Multi-User Interaction
  This paper presents an intuitive interaction technique for data exchange between multiple co-located devices. In the proposed system, CrossOverlayDesktop, desktop graphics of the devices are graphically overlaid with each other (i.e., alpha-blended). Users can exchange file data by the usual drag-and-drop manipulation through an overlaid area. The overlaid area is determined by the physical six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) correlation of the devices and thus changes according to users' direct movements of the devices. Because familiar operations such as drag-and-drop can be applied to file exchange between multiple devices, seamless, consistent, and thus intuitive multi-user collaboration is realized. Furthermore, dynamic overlay of desktop graphics allows users to intuitively establish communication, identify connected devices, and perform access control. For access control of the data, users can protect their own data by simply dragging them out of the overlaid area, because only the overlaid area becomes a public space. Several proof-of-concept experiments and evaluations were conducted. Results show the effectiveness of the proposed interaction technique.
  

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Rubbing(TAKUHON) Interface

  • Shohei Matsumoto,Octobar,2009

Rubbing(TAKUHON) Interface
  In recent years, people are more and more inclined to handle digitaldocuments as is without printing them out, in response to the trend ofpaperless office, e-book reader et al. Meanwhile the physical paperand the digital paper are still used separately based on usage scenesbecause the digital paper can’t replace the physical paper in manyaspects: the physical paper, for example, can be direct-operated andthe user can gain insights about its content at a glance. Thesefeatures have made the physical paper a killer-interface for a longtime. There have been a lot of researches which integrate the usage ofthe physical paper into digital interaction in the field of HumanInterface. These challenges, however, have only intended to assistPC-work on desktop. The digitalization of the paper use in non-PCenvironment has not been realized yet.Our research aims to propose the new interaction using ahandheld-display device to alternate a part of the tangible operationof paper use such as picking up, disposing and copying. Furthermore,we are trying to extend the digital operation, copy-and-paste and datamanagement etc., to the tangible paper operation by forming a newuser's mental model of scrapping with the device. To accomplish ourgoal, firstly we proposed the Rubbing Interface. Rubbing Interface isa handheld-display device for copying information on the paper as animage by compressing the device to the paper directly. This is a newscrapping interface which stores information hierarchically bycompressing the device to the paper.
  

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ThermoEnhancer: A Glove Enhancing Thermoesthesia

  • Yuki Iwanaka and Kosuke Sato, "ThermoEnhancer: A Glove Enhancing Thermoesthesia"シ係orld Haptics 2007, HOD16, 2007.

ThermoEnhancer: A Glove Enhancing Thermoesthesia
  We propose the technique of augmenting human thermal sensing ability beyond the usual psychological limit. We construct a glove type augmenting system. ThermoEnhancer. When a user wearing the system touches an object, its temperature information obtained by a temperature sensor is amplified and displayed to the user's palm using a Peltier heat/cool device embedded in the system. In the demonstration, users wear ThermoEnhancer and touch various kinds of objects around them including their own bodies, then feel temperatures augmented. As a result, the users can perceive a weaker thermal stimulation and a tiny temperature change. We believe that thermo enhancement is one of promising fields in haptic interface.
  

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The HYPERREAL Design System

  • Keiko Yamamoto, Masaru Hisada, Ichi Kanaya, Kosuke Sato: The HYPERREAL Design System; SIGGRAPH2005 DVD-ROM (Jul. 2005)

The HYPERREAL Design System
  This paper presents a new MR (mixed reality) system for virtually modifying (e.g., denting, engraving, swelling) shape of real objects by using projection of computer-generated shade. Users of this system (named Hyperreal) recognize as if the real object was actually deformed when they operate the system to modify the shape of the object while only the shade pattern of the real object is changed. The authors are aiming to apply this technology to product designing field: designers would be able to evaluate and modify form of their product more efficiently and effectively by using Hyperreal than conventional design process (typically, CAD (computer aided design) systems and solid mock-ups) since the system is able to give actuality of real mock-up and still gives flexibility of shape data on a computer system (such as CAD system).
  

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The HYPERREAL Design System --- Visual Forming of Real Object Using Virtual-Shade Projection

  • Ichiroh Kanaya, Masaru Hisada, Keiko Yamamoto, and Kosuke Sato, The HYPERREAL Design System --- Visual Forming of Real Object Using Virtual-Shade Projection, HCI International 2005, pp. *-* (2005).

The HYPERREAL Design System --- Visual Forming of Real Object Using Virtual-Shade Projection
  This paper presents a new mixed reality (MR) system for virtually controlling shape of real object with shade-pattern projection. This system gives its users high spatial and stereoscopic effect by watching the real object and ability of controlling 3-D surface appearance without damaging 3-D feeling impression. The authors demonstrate the availability of this system through comparative experiment and virtual forming application.
  

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Non-verbal Mapping between Sound and Color - Mapping Derived from Colored Hearing Synesthetes and Its Applications -

  • Nagata, N., Iwai, D., Sanae H. Wake, Inokuchi, S.(2005.09). Non-verbal Mapping between Sound and Color - Mapping Derived from Colored Hearing Synesthetes and Its Applications -. F. Kishino et al. (Eds.): ICEC2005, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 3711, Berlin et al.: Springer-Verlag, 401-412.

Non-verbal Mapping between Sound and Color - Mapping Derived from Colored Hearing Synesthetes and Its Applications -
  This paper presents an attempt at 'non-verbal mapping' between music and images. We use physical parameters of key, height and timbre as sound, and hue, brightness and chroma as color, to clarify their direct correspondence. First we derive a mapping rule between sound and color from those with such special abilities as 'colored hearing'. Next we apply the mapping to everyday people using a paired comparison test and key identification training, and we find similar phenomena to colored hearing among everyday people. The experimental result shows a possibility that they also have potential of ability of sound and color mapping.
  

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TOOL DEVICE:Handy Haptic Feedback Devices Imitating Everyday Tools

  • Youichi Ikeda, Kosuke Sato, Asako Kimura, TOOL DEVICE: Handy Haptic Feedback Devices Imitating Every Day Tools, HCI International 2003, pp. 661-665 (2003)

TOOL DEVICE:Handy Haptic Feedback Devices Imitating Everyday Tools
  In this paper, we propose handy haptic devices named Tool Device. Tool Device is designed withmetaphor of everyday tools, such as scissors, tweezers and syringe, which have good shapeaffordance by themselves, and allows users seamless manipulation of multimedia data in anextended information environment. Just as users feel haptic feedback from everyday tools whilehandling physically, the Tool Devices can also have haptic feedback to show the quantity andfreshness of the handling data. We developed two types of the Tool Devices, a Syringe Device anda Tweezers Device, and studied their application to the manipulation of music and text data.Results showed that the Tool Devices were easy to manipulate because of their shape and hapticfeedback, and users could use them without any training.
  

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